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This business coaching episode explains why it's necessary to be micromanager.

Results-Focused Training, Tools, and Workshops from Expert Business Coaches.

Featured Coaching Excerpt - Notes & Transcript, Part 1
  • Jargonization Translation: Micromanage - Controlling every part, however small, of an enterprise or activity (generally has a negative connotation).
  • Ask Yourself: Do I micromanage my employees?
  • Mystic Statistic: 13% of employees are engaged at work." - Gallup Poll
  • Recommended Reading: Winning - The Ultimate Business How-To Book - Jack Welch
  • Principle #1: Your follow-up does not cause people to perform poorly.
  • Principle #2: You can only expect what you inspect.
  • Principle #3: Accountability makes slackers attack you personally.
  • Notable Quotable: "One of my favorite perks was picking out an issue and doing what I called a 'deep dive'. It's spotting a challenge where you think you can make a difference...one that looks like it would be fun, and then throwing the weight of your position behind it. ... Some might justifiably call it 'meddling' ...I followed up on all of them with passion and a mania that often veered toward the lunatic fringe... To make the initiatives work, it took a passionate all-consuming commitment from the top. Beyond passion, there was a lot of rigor ...Making initiatives successful is all about focus and passionate commitment. The drumbeat must be relentlessness." - Jack Welch
  • Bio: Jack Welch was a chairman and CEO of General Electric between 1981 and 2001. During his tenure at GE, the company's value rose 4,000%. In 2006, Welch's net worth was estimated at $720 million. When he retired from GE he took a severance payment of $417 million, the largest such payment in history.

[MUSIC PLAYING]

-Today we are talking about management. 13% of employees are engaged in it. If you are a fastidious manager, you would be called a micro-manager.

-Fastidious management versus micromanagement. All right Clay, today we are talking about management. Specifically we're comparing the fastidious management versus micromanagement. And we're kind of doing a deep dive into this. All right? Go ahead. You want to say something?

-I want to say one thing.

-Take the stage. I want to just say one thing. We have a lot of thrivers who are asking us right now all across the world who are saying, I don't know how to manage people without micromanaging em. Am I doing something wrong? People keep telling me I'm micromanaging them. Where really, if you've ever been accused of being a micro-manager, if You've ever been told you're a micro-manager, if you've ever just felt like, am I a micro-manager, This is for you.

-Right. Here we go. And I know that specifically a Gallup poll, recently this is a mystic statistic for you. Recent Gallup poll says that 13% of employees are engaged at work. Now if you do the math, that is far less than the amount of people that are disengaged.

-Yes.

-That's far less. OK. So if you now are a manager, or would like to be a manager, these are the type of people you'll be managing. I also have a notable quotable here before we get started. This from Jack Welch. Now Jack Welch is known as quite a good manager, would you say?

-Yeah. Well, Jack, what Jack did is when he took over as a CEO of General Electric, the company had-- essentially just a real quick thing here for you-- the company basically was growing every year, kind of like a 3% growth, where it's almost not noticeable. And when he took over, the company did this. And they grew by, roughly, 4,000%--

CALEB: Yep, 4,000%.

-during his tenure. So we're talking about-- they were just barely going along for years, and then he-- so he knows a little bit about management.

-OK. And if you haven't read his book, "Winning," you should. And you wanting to be manager, you are a manager, that's incredible. But here's the notable quotable from Jack. He says,

"One of my favorite perks was picking out an issue and doing what I called a 'deep dive.' It's spotting a challenge where you think you can make a difference, one that looks like it would be fun, and then throwing the weight of your position behind it. Some might justifiably call it 'meddling'... I followed up on all of them with a passion and a mania that often veered toward the lunatic fringe... To make the initiatives work, it took a passionate all-consuming commitment from the top. Beyond passion, there was a lot of rigor... Making initiatives successful is all about focus and passionate commitment. The drumbeat must be relentless."

Again, this is from Jack Welch, the excellent manager that increased GE. He actually took it I think from $19 billion dollar evaluation to $280 billion dollar evaluation. This guy knows how to manage, Clay. What is he talking about in this quote?

-I would say if you were to define a micro-manager, and you were to make a list of all the words, so you say, If I asked you, what is a micro-manager?

: Right.

-What is the guy who can't write the word manager? What is a micro-manager? Let me ask you, What is a micro-manager? Just think for a second. What are the terms you would think of? Meddler, relentless, focused, deep dive--

: A little bit of a lunatic.

-All-consuming, kind of a lunatic.

: (LAUGHING)

-OK.

-There you go. This is what we're talking about today. OK. Fastidious management versus micromanagement, what it is. This one's for you. OK. What we're covering is three principles.

One, you're followup does not cause people to perform poorly. Your followup doesn't cause people to perform poorly. Principle number two, you can only expect what you inspect. Principle number three, accountability makes slackers attack you personally.

-OK.

-Here we go. Principle number one, you're followup does not cause people to perform poorly. I have a notable quotable here from David Glass. Now this is the former CEO of Walmart, the owner of the Kansas City Royals major league baseball team. What else do we know?

Do you know anything else about, as far as David glass, that we should know before we dive in here? I mean, CEO of Walmart, I guess gives him some credibility.

-Walmart has gone up and down a little bit as being the world's biggest company. But if you're going to take over for Sam Walton In that lineage of leaders who've led one of the world's largest companies, you know a little bit about management.

: OK. (LAUGHING)

Featured Coaching Excerpt - Notes & Transcript, Part 2
  • Notable Quotable: "If you are a fastidious manager, you will be called a micromanager."
  • Lesson Nugget: If someone calls you a micromanager, take it as compliment and enthusiastically agree!
  • Lesson Nugget: People who do not finish their tasks or do them poorly may resent those who are checking their work.
  • Lesson Nugget: Poor performances need constant prodding, not more autonomy.
  • Principle #2: You can only expect what you inspect.
  • Notable Quotable: "You can expect what you inspect." - W. Edwards Deming
  • Notable Quotable: "When Sam feels a certain way, he is relentless. He will just wear you out... As long as he is convinced that it is the right thing, it just keeps coming up week after week until everybody capitulates and says, well it's easier to do it than to keep fighting this fight. I guess it could be called management by wearing you down." - David Glass (Former CEO of Walmart)

[MUSIC PLAYING] -Safe to assume, here's what he says. When Sam feels a certain way, he is relentless. He will just wear you out. As long as he is convinced that it is the right thing, it just keeps coming up week after week and tell everybody capitulates and says, well it's easier to do it then to just keep fighting this fight. I guess it could be called management by wearing you down. This is how he's saying he observed Sam do it, Sam Walton. How does this notable quotable stand out so you, and I guess I'm gonna ask you to break it down like fractions, or just break it down for us. -Well we go back to this word micro-manager, -Mm, yes. -If you were to make a list of all the-- what are the things that make someone a micro-manager? -Wears you down. -Relentless, keeps coming up, wearing you down. Huh. -Yeah, they're just fighting, he's saying that's what Sam did. But he, as long as he knew he was right, that's what he did. -That's what he did. -I love it, I love it. What action items can we take here from this first principle for the Thriver watching right now, and maybe they are manager, they're hoping to be a manager. Action items for us. -First off. If you are a fastidious manager, you will be called a micro-manager. -Whoa. -So let's get to this principle. When I follow up with someone, and I say did you do it right? They're going to immediately, if they're a slacker, if they don't like accountability, if there's somebody who just for whatever reason struggles to get something done, they're going to say you're a micro-manager. And, I'm giving you the power right now, if you're a manager. I give you the power to say, yes I am. And that's what you want. You need to be focused, deep diving, all consuming, lunatic, relentless. -Wow -Both of them were relentless. Sam Walton was relentless, Jack Welch is relentless. Meddlers. They keep bringing the thing up. They wear you down. This is what I'm talking about. You've got to be-- this is the personality profile of a successful manager. And you've got to deep dive. -And I feel like you're encouraging Thrivers right now who are watching, where this principle is that you're not responsible for poor performance. By following up doesn't mean that caused the poor performance. You follow up with someone and you say, did you do it? And they always go, well I would do it if you'd give me my space. If you weren't micromanaging me I'd get it done. That's not true. I can't tell you how many times I've gone into a call center for a company that's hired me to come in there, and I'll sit with the rep or I'll listen to the rep, and I'll listen to their calls. And it says clearly, these calls may be recorded for quality assurance. And then I listen to the calls, and the reps like, you listened to my calls? You listened to all my calls? -Yeah. -Well, I can't work under this kind of pressure. You guys are micromanaging. -So you're saying somebody like that that's not performing doesn't deserve more autonomy, they don't deserve more of that? -Autonomy is earned, guys. You earn responsibility. Through being responsible, you earn more autonomy. -Okay. -But I'm just trying to explain to you that the majority of the human race is not organized. They don't deliver, they don't get things done, the majority of people. -So action item is to make sure if you're a manager, that your character traits look like this. -Yes, and specifically, you said before 13%-- -That is true. -of the population is engaged. So we've got to get these people to get their job done. And it requires a little bit of these traits to make this growth happen. You have to do this with these people to make that growth. That's how it works. -OK. I love it, I love it. Principle number two, you can only expect what you inspect. Now we've got a notable quotable from W Edwards Deming. Now, there might be some Thrivers out here who don't know man is. Talk to me, who is W Edwards Deming? -He is a guy that, if you look him up and you kind of do your research, some people credit him as being the guy who really helped take quality control to the next level. He's kind of like a quality control expert, a quality control leader. He's been asked to speak at thousands of events all over the world. Major, major companies that have quality control problems have brought him in to fix their problems. And he's kind of known like, you probably haven't see this movie, because most people watching this are probably unfamiliar with the movie Ghostbusters, but back in the day you say when there's something where your neighborhood, who're you going to call? You call the Ghostbusters. Well back in the day, that's what you would do. If you had said, I got some quality control problems, who we gonna call? We're gonna call this Deming fellow. He's gonna come in and fix it. -This is what he says. You can expect what you inspect. You can expect what you inspect. But he's saying you can't expect anything you don't inspect. -Yeah, which sounds a lot like micro-managing. -Woah. -Deep diving. -Woah. -Focus.

Featured Coaching Excerpt - Notes & Transcript, Part 3
  • Jargonization Translation: SEO (Search Engine Optimization): The process of affecting the visibility of a website in a search engine's unpaid results.
  • Action Step: Delegation without follow-up guarantees your failure. Following-up gets things done.
  • Action Step: Every single time you delegate something, you need to schedule a time to follow-up.
  • Notable Quotable: "Accountability breeds response-ability." - Stephen Covey
  • Principle #3: Accountability makes slackers attack you personally.

[MUSIC PLAYING] -Meta-links, I'll give you an example. SPEAKER: Yeah give us an ample example right here right now, Clay, share with us, right now. CLAY: Search engine optimization requires a very detailed checklist. Let me give you a few things. You have to have a title tag and your title tag can't be longer than 10 words. OK? SPEAKER: Right. -So it has to be 10 words or less. SPEAKER: By the way, if this is at all interesting, we have episodes here on SEO. Go ahead and find those and do a deep dive that'll teach you how to do it. -It has to be separated by a vertical bar. Then the key words-- you don't want to have more than six keyword phrases. And you have to have a permalink. And you're going, what does this mean? The point is, there is a list-- if you're going to be doing search engine optimization, there is a list of about 13 items that have to be done on every page in order for it to be Google friendly. SPEAKER: Right. -Now, if I don't follow up, and look at the title tag of every single page and look at the keyword density and look at the-- and you're going what does that mean? The point is, there's a website called SEOMoz, a little bonus tip for you, called SEOMoz, a little nugget, seomoz.com. There's another website that's fabulous. And it's called Copyscape, copyscape.com. Those are two tools. Copyscape allows me to check if anyone on my team is illegally copying the text of somebody else and if they're violating any of the search engine rules. SPEAKER: Wait, but Clay, people wouldn't do that. People wouldn't copy. CLAY: And I got to tell you something. There's an employee who used to work in my office. And this employee was dating another person-- he was dating the sister of one of my employees. So it's kind of like his boss was if that relationship worked out would end up being his brother-in-law. SPEAKER: OK, his boss would be his brother-- -So his boss would end up being his brother-in-law if the relationship worked out. And every single day he literally would go to a competitor's website and just copy the text-- SPEAKER: Nooo. - --put it into Notepad, convert it from HTML over there into the text. SPEAKER: What's the impact if you did-- -Put it the site. And so I ran a Copyscape report. And I found it every single page he had written that week, he'd illegally copied. And the impact-- the company's website would have fallen like a rock. The company that we were doing website optimization for-- SPEAKER: Google flags it. - --they would have gone from top in Google to bottom in Google-- SPEAKER: Google flags it, OK. - --because of his jackasssery. If I would not have been a lunatic, all consuming, deep dive, focus, relentless, meddling, worrying you down, keep coming up kind up kind of guy, it wouldn't have got done. SPEAKER: So you're saying if you delegate something, you have to follow up. CLAY: You got to follow up, baby. And then people are going to say, you're a micromanager. And you go, that's right. SPEAKER: OK, action items right here for the thrivers watching. What do they need to do? Give us an action item right here. You can only expect what you inspect. -Every single time that you delegate something, you must schedule a time to follow up. -Every single time. If not, what can you expect then? -Jackassery. No , jackasssery-- if you're-- -That's a Greek word, right? -Well, if you were to get into the Bible, it's a controversial book. Just work from this, but in the Bible there is the word-- they use jackass a couple of times. And it refers to a donkey. SPEAKER: Sure. -You know, a donkey. So if you were to think about how if you were to hire a donkey to do search engine, or sales, or marketing, or customer service, whatever the thing is. If you hire a donkey, physical donkey, to do it, that's about the same quality level is you can expect if you don't follow up. Picture a donkey coming to work in your office. Hee haw. That's the kind of quality you're going to expect if you don't follow up. SPEAKER: I love it. Here we go. Principle number three, accountability makes slackers attack you personally. It makes them attack you personally. I've got a notable quotable year from Stephen Covey, the author of "Seven Habits for Highly Effective People." Why else should we be listening to Stephen Covey here? -Stephen Covey is a guy who has devoted his lifetime to studying successful people. And he wrote a book that it's kind of like if you're going to talk about, well, I only have 10 books. You know, I'm going to disappear. And I only have 10 books. I'm going to move into the woods for six months. And I am going to take 10 books with me. And I want to come back with a changed life. This is a weird scenario, but-- -It's a very weird scenario. -Anyway, it says, you got to go to the woods for six months. You are going on an extended vacation. You got 10 books. You got to take them with you, when you come back, it'll change your life. "Think and Grow Rich" is on that list. Then you've got "How to Win Friends and Influence People"-- "Seven Habits of Highly Effective People." This is the Stephen Covey book. That's on that list. That's in the top 10. SPEAKER: It's an incredible book. -Awesome book. -So this is what he says, "Accountability breeds responsibility." Accountability breeds responsibility. So he's saying when you're keeping people accountable, they now feel the responsibility. And they don't always like that. Is that what he's saying? -I'm going to tell you this. Now, remember, there is-- don't lose hope, folks. 13% of people are engaged at work. SPEAKER: There you go. -So I'm going to give you an example. I assigned a task this week to a young man named Dan. And I followed up, and I said, hey Dan, did you get that done? He goes, absolutely bro, let me show you. -Whoa, he sounds engaged. -I assigned a task this week to a lady named Deidra-- fabulous lady. I follow up. Hey, Deidra, did you get that done. Absolutely. SPEAKER: Love it. -Assigned another task right there to a guy named Caleb. Not you, the other one. -Caleb number 2. -Got it done. Assigned a task to a guy named Marshall. Did he get it done? SPEAKER: Yep. -Got it done.

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