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This episode is a business coaching course that talks about becoming checklist dependent.

Results-Focused Training, Tools, and Workshops from Expert Business Coaches.

Featured Coaching Excerpt - Notes & Transcript, Part 1
  • S.C.A.L.E : Checklist Dependent
  • Notable Quotable: “The volume and complexity of what we know has exceeded our individual ability to deliver its benefits correctly, safely, or reliably...Good checklists are precise. They are efficient, to the point, and easy to use even in the most difficult situations. They do not try to spell out everything--a checklist cannot fly a plane. Instead, they provide reminders of only the most critical and important steps--the ones that even the highly skilled professional using them could miss. Good checklists are, above all, practical.”
    -Atul Gawande
    (American surgeon, writer, and public health researcher. He practices general and endocrine surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. )
  • Editor's Note: The Checklist Manifesto
    -Atul Gawande
  • Mystic Statistic: “When the state of Michigan began using a checklist for central lines in its intensive care units, its infection rate plummeted 66% in just three months. Soon, its ICUs were outperforming 90% of all hospitals nationwide. In 18 months, the checklist saved an estimated 175 million dollars and 1500 lives.”
    -Atul Gawande - Checklist Manifesto
    (Huffington Post)
  • Notable Quotable: “We don’t like checklists. They can be painstaking. They’re not much fun. But I don’t think the issue here is mere laziness. There’s something deeper, more visceral going on when people walk away not only from saving lives but from making money. It somehow feels beneath us to use a checklist, an embarrassment. It runs counter to deeply held beliefs about how the truly great among us—those we aspire to be—handle situations of high stakes and complexity. The truly great are daring. They improvise. They do not have protocols and checklists. Maybe our idea of heroism needs updating.”
    -Atul Gawande
    (American surgeon, writer, and public health researcher. He practices general and endocrine surgery at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. )

- Let's tap into the second one from the SCALE acronym here which is the checklist, being checklist dependent, and I'm gonna set it up for you here with a notable quotable. - [Clay] Sure. - It says this. "The volume and complexity of what we know "has exceeded our individual ability to deliver--" That's my Spanish, I'm sorry. "To deliver its benefits correctly, safely, or reliably. "Good checklists are precise. "They are efficient, to the point, and easy to use "even in the most difficult situations. "They do not try to spell out everything. "A checklist cannot fly a plane. "Instead, they provide reminders "of only the most critical and important steps, "the ones that even the highly skilled professional "using them could miss. "Good checklists, above all, they're practical." Clay? - Well, what you're doing here is you're-- A guy by the name of Atul Gawande, he's the guy who wrote this quote. Atul Gawande. This guy is a surgeon, and he wrote a book called The Checklist Manifesto, and what he's talkin' about is that surgeons will forget critical steps, and we have all sorts of research, and I wanted to read something to you. This is a mystic statistic I want to read to you here. "When the state of Michigan began using a checklist "for central lines in the intensive care units, "its infection rate plummeted 66% in just three months. - Wow. - "Soon, its ICUs were outperforming "90% of the hospitals nationwide, "and in 18 months, the checklists saved "an estimated 175 million dollars and 1500 lives." This is something that Atul Gawande-- This is research he did that was published in the Huffington Post, but what I'm saying is a checklist can literally save lives, but it can also save sales deals, it can save relationships. You can save a vacation. You just don't wanna forget the easily forgettable things. You wanna focus your mind on the hard to do things. You don't want to waste your mind focusing on not forgetting basic things. - And I think that'll also take you to the next level in your leadership, because you might be at a level that might be here, but you wanna scale it up, and I see that how successful entrepreneurs and business people-- I see you, I see Marshall, I see other leaders here at Thrive that you guys always have your checklist. You're always stickin' to it and doin' it, and that is excellent. - Well you have to be checklist dependent, and I wanna read this next notable quotable cause I think this is somethin' that... I really love Atul Gawande. I love his writing style. I love the way-- Cause he's a surgeon who went into the world of business and the medical world and looked at how do great companies do it right? And one thing he says, he says, "We don't like checklists. "They can be painstaking. "They're not much fun, but I don't think the issue here "is mere laziness. "There's something deeper, more visceral, going on. "People walk away not only from saving lives "but from making money. "It somehow feels beneath us to use a checklist. "An embarrassment. "It runs counter to deeply held beliefs about how "the truly great among us, those we aspire to be "handle situations of high stakes and complexity. "The truly great are daring. "They improvise. "They don't have protocols and checklists. "Maybe our idea of heroism needs updating." What he's talking about is that the great people really do use checklists. They do use systems, but we start to think that they don't, and so as we kinda transition into our next point here, I just want to make sure we all have that mindset that we really really really really really really need to have checklists, and we need to have a business that's dependent upon those checklists.

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